About WSPA

The World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) exists to tackle animal cruelty across the globe. They work directly with animals and with the people and organisations that can ensure animals are treated with respect and compassion.

 

WSPA's vision: a world where animal welfare matters and animal cruelty has ended.

The World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) exists to tackle animal cruelty across the globe. They work directly with animals and with the people and organisations that can ensure animals are treated with respect and compassion.

With your support, they campaign effectively to combat the world’s most intense and large-scale animal welfare issues. They bring about lasting change by:

- helping people understand the critical importance of good animal welfare

- encouraging nations to commit to animal-friendly practices

- building the scientific case for the better treatment of animals.

 

WSPA’s work is focused on four priority animal welfare areas:

Animals in communities – prevention of cruelty and inhumane culling of animals from fear of rabies.

Animals in the wild – intensive farming and the cruel management and killing of wild animals for food or by-products.

Animals in farming – intensive farming, long distance transport and inhumane slaughter of animals for food.

Animals in disasters – providing care to animals suffering as a result of man-made or natural disasters, and thereby protecting people’s livelihoods.

To find out more about WSPA’s work across the globe, visit: www.wspa.org.au

 

Asher Keddie – WSPA National Ambassador

Animal-lover Asher Keddie became a WSPA Ambassador in 2012. In October she embarked on her first mission – to take part in the rescue and freeing of some of the final bears held in captivity in Romania. Deep in Transylvania, Asher spent a week at the WSPA-funded bear sanctuary, Zarnesti. Run by WSPA’s local partner, the forest sanctuary is home to more than 60 bears, all rescued from lives of torment and captivity. To find out more about her journey, visit: http://blogs.bricksforbears.org.au/


Discuss this article

Newsletter

Never miss a Nat Geo moment

Your email address
Submit