Bengal Tiger

Video highlights from Animal Encounters

A tiger’s large canine teeth and powerful jaws are used to grab a prey animal by the neck and suffocate it.

Bengal Tiger
Scientific name: Panthera tigris tigris

Facts:

•     The Bengal Tiger probably arrived in the Indian subcontinent approximately 12,000 years ago. It occurs in India, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh.

•    Females give birth to litters of two to six cubs, which they raise with little or no help from the male. Cubs cannot hunt until they are 18 months old and remain with their mothers for two to three years, when they disperse to find their own territory.

•    Weight: 109 to 227 kg

•    Tigers are patient hunters and can move slowly and quietly, stalking their prey for 20 or 30 minutes. A tiger’s large canine teeth and powerful jaws are used to grab a prey animal by the neck and suffocate it. Tigers use their sandpaper-rough tongues to scrape the last bits of meat from the bones of a meal.

•    A tiger’s front paws are large and strong to bring down prey. The front paws of a tiger have five toes each. The claws can be pulled inside while the tiger walks, which helps keep the claws sharp. Tigers also use their claws to mark their territory by scratching on trees. Conveniently, this also sharpens the claws.

Discuss this article

Newsletter

Never miss a Nat Geo moment

Your email address
Submit