Exciting Interactive Penguin Exhibit Opening In Sydney

An exciting, world first penguin exhibit is set to open at SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium this November.

SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium is already home to over 700 species including massive grey nurse sharks and adorable dugongs but this summer the aquarium is set to introduce two new exciting species, the King and Gentoo Penguin.

The exhibit represents an investment of $9 million, making it SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium’s most expensive investment ever. The exhibit will be a one-of-a-kind, interactive ‘journey’ where guests will travel on rafts through the snowy, 6 degree environment getting up close with two of the most amazing penguins on Earth. The expedition is inspired by Macquarie Island - an Australian owned island that lies in the southwest Pacific Ocean. This is the first time sub-Antarctic penguins call Sydney home.

“Penguin Island Expedition is an exciting, world first innovation and a must-see for local and international visitors alike. Offering true immersion in a brilliant replica of our penguins’ natural home. The ride allows guests to make amazing discoveries about life on Macquarie Island, the different personalities of cheeky Gentoo and majestic King Penguins, and how we all play a role in protecting their futures” | Rob Smith, Divisional Director, Merlin Entertainment ANZ

The impressive King penguin can reach heights of 100 cm and weigh up to 15 kg. [Photograph provided by SEA LIFE Aquarium]

With wild penguin colonies under increasing threat from pollution, habitat destruction and climate change, it’s important to build relationships between people and penguins so we understand how our actions may be affecting the penguin’s habitat.

The adorable Gentoo penguin is the most northerly of Antarctic penguins; they reach heights of 71cm and weigh around 6kg. [Photograph provided by SEA LIFE Aquarium]

The aquarium is working alongside the SEA LIFE Trust and Macquarie Island researchers to highlight strong conservation messages throughout the experience.

 

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