Extremely Rare Albino Orangutan Found in Indonesia

The foundation nursing the primate back to health says they have never taken care of an albino orangutan and cannot find others like it in the wild.

A rare albino orangutan was rescued earlier this month from a village in Indonesia where it was kept in a cage.

The five-year-old orangutan, which was rescued from the Kapuas Hulu district in Borneo, has made quite a comeback, gaining up to 10 pounds in a couple of weeks.

The Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation is caring for the primate, according to the Telegraph. Orangutans are critically endangered, meaning they are one step away from extinction, and the foundation cares for close to 500 of them. The foundation reported that it had never cared for an albino orangutan at the rehabilitation centre in its 25-year history.

The foundation held an international campaign asking for name suggestions from around the world. Ultimately it chose “Alba,” meaning “white” in Latin and “dawn” in Spanish.

"Hopefully a new dawn will come for these precious animals," the group said in a statement reported by the Jakarta Post.

RELATED PICTURES: RARE WHITE GIRAFFE AND OTHER UNUSUALLY PALE ANIMALS

WHITE GIRAFFE Omo, a year-old Masai giraffe calf, lives in Tanzania's Tarangire National Park.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY DEREK LEE, CATERS NEWS

"SPIRIT" BEAR The Kermode bear is a white black bear—a variant of the North American black bear—that lives in British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest.
PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL NICKLEN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

DIVINE GIFTS White lions feed on a gazelle in South Africa’s Sanbona Wildlife Reserve. According to African folklore, white lions are children of the Sun God sent to Earth as divine gifts.
PHOTOGRAPH BY LUCIANO CANDISANI, MINDEN PICTURES/CORBIS

RARE ALBINO Snowflake, the only known albino western lowland gorilla in history, died at the Barcelona Zoo in 2003 due to skin cancer.
PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL A. ZAHL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

LUCKY ELEPHANT A newborn white elephant gets a bath in Naypyidaw, Myanmar (Burma), in 2012. In Thailand, white elephants are considered lucky because they're associated with the birth of the Buddha.
PHOTOGRAPH BY SOE THAN WIN, GETTY IMAGES

SQUIRREL OF A DIFFERENT COLOUR North American squirrels come in a variety of colours, including black and white—such as this animal. Rarely are white squirrels actually albino.
PHOTOGRAPH BY COLIN MCCONNELL, TORONTO STAR/GETTY IMAGES

WHALE OF A SURPRISE An albino humpback calf was spotted in 2011 off Australia‘s Whitsunday Island. Many albinos struggle to survive in the wild due to their conspicuous colour.
PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY GREAT BARRIER REEF MARINE PARK AUTHORITY

SACRED ANIMAL White buffalo are not only rare (just one of every ten million buffalo are born white), they are considered sacred by many Native Americans. They may be albino or leucistic.
PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN BLEIER, AFP/GETTY

ALBINO CRAYFISH Even invertebrates can be albino, such as this crayfish.
PHOTOGRAPH BY WES C. SKILES, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

Bornean orangutans’ long hair is usually an orangish-brown color, and they are known to be highly intelligent. Albino orangutans are extremely rare, though there have been other instances of albino primates, like Snowflake the albino gorilla and a spider monkey in Honduras.

The Jakarta Post reports that the foundation is closely studying albinism in apes to determine how to best help Alba. They have not been able to find any other examples of the genetic condition in orangutans, and albinism can affect sensory nerves and organs like the eyes. Albinism can occur more frequently in primates and other vertebrate species because of environmental stress and inbreeding in isolated populations, according to a study published in SciELO Argentina.

The IUCN estimates that around 104,000 orangutans live on Borneo, a number that is much lower than the estimated 288,000 orangutans on the island in 1973. The IUCN projects that orangutan numbers will continue to shrink to 47,000 by the year 2025, due to hunting and deforestation contributing to habitat loss.

Discuss this article

Newsletter

Never miss a Nat Geo moment

Your email address
Submit