Meet Jane Goodall….The Bilby

Yours and our favourite: Jane Goodall, has just had a Bilby named after her.

Jane Goodall visited Queensland this week, and of course, she had something named after her.

The legend and Dame, Jane Goodall has been touring Australia as part of her speaking tour ‘An Evening With Jane Goodall’.

While in Queensland she met with Frank Manthey the co-founder of Queensland’s Save the Bilby conservation group.

Jane Goodall, renowned for her work studying and living amongst chimpanzees in Africa, is responsible for countless conservation efforts and development programs all over the world.

I found out we had a really wonderful person who is a legend in conservation, Jane Goodall was coming to Australia, she's a remarkable person and has done fantastic work, said Manthey.

Although Jane has had a multitude of things named after her, including a tree in Western Australia (the Dr Jane), she is yet to have a Bilby named after her.

I've never had a bilby named after me; it's wonderful to meet these animals that I worked so hard to help conserve.

The Save the Bilby conservation group, is a step in the right direction, but Jane acknowledges that there is still work to do.

BilbyImage: Rick Stephens

All this work to save, breed and release endangered species, it means we have to be concerned with the environment, we have to protect the environment.

Jane’s (the Bilby) other two siblings were named Daisy and Blossom by schoolchildren after a competition was held to name the remaining bilbies.

The team from the Save the Bilby Fund, said twins weren’t uncommon among bilbies, but triplets were a surprise, and as they are all female the future of development and breeding for the endangered bilby species is promising.

Before Jane visited the triplet bilbies, she toured the RSPCA, meeting Dawn Fraser, patron of the Save the Bilby Fund and Environmentalist Bob Irwin.

Jane, Blossom and Daisy are the first triplet bilbies born to south-east Queensland’s Ipswich nature centre.

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