Shot of Carrot Vodka Anyone?

Why throw it out when you can drink it?

In an effort to reduce food wastage two farmer’s wives have come up with the best thing since sliced bread.

The pair, Alice Gorman and Gen Windley were inspired by a brewer in Ipswich who made carrots into beer. Although Ms Gorman doesn’t drink beer, the creativity of the brewer inspired her:

Every year we grow, pick and pack 350 million carrots, and they're the good-looking ones. But we have cracked, marked or wonky ones that won't travel well to chain stores.

The two are part of a growing group of farmer’s wives exploring ways to use the odd or ugly produce that cannot be sold to large chains.

Starting with a cut carrot range, the women experimented with carrot beer and carrot bread before moving onto something a little stronger…

With Jason Hannay from the Flinders Peak Winery’s advice, the two started trialling their carrot vodka. Made entirely from locally sourced produce the spirit was created with and by local residents.

We consider ourselves carrotologists

Before the distilling process, the carrot is reduced to a type of stock and then added to a Shiraz base. According to Ms Windley, each bottle is about 20 percent carrot.

We like to say the carrot vodka adds to the two fruit and five vegetables each day. We're still waiting to get research to back that up, but the label certainly says, 'drink your vegetables.

Australia rejects an estimated 20-40 percent of fruit and vegetables even before reaching major chains because of their cosmetic appeal (they’re odd or ugly). According to FoodWise, Australia wastes enough to fill 450,000 garbage trucks every year. If those full garbage trucks were placed end to end, they would bridge the gap between Australia and New Zealand three times over.

Shutterstock: Carrot harvest, Shutterstock

Carrot vodka is just one of the more creative ways to use up the food deemed “unsellable” by major food chains and grocers.

The carroty spirit will debut during the Scenic Rim Eat Local Week and Winter Harvest Festival.

A good way to get your five a day.

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