Oil And Gas Drilling Is Causing Birds To Have Fewer Chicks loading...
Oil And Gas Drilling Is Causing Birds To Have Fewer Chicks
A new study is the first in any animal to link noise pollution to stress and show that this connection can disrupt reproduction.
Why These Birds Carry Flames In Their Beaks loading...
Why These Birds Carry Flames In Their Beaks
Australia's indigenous peoples have long observed "firehawks" spreading wildfires throughout the country's tropical landscapes.
New Feathered Dinosaur Had Four Wings but Couldn't Fly loading...
New Feathered Dinosaur Had Four Wings but Couldn't Fly
In a surprise for paleontologists, the well-preserved fossil suggests that the animal spent its life scampering around on the forest floor.
This New Parrot Species Sounds Like a Hawk loading...
This New Parrot Species Sounds Like a Hawk
A new study says the bright, noisy bird have escaped notice in Mexico's Yucatán forests—but parrot experts are sceptical.
In a First, Bird Uses Tools to Make Sweet Music loading...
In a First, Bird Uses Tools to Make Sweet Music
The palm cockatoo is the only species aside from humans that can drum a rhythmic beat with its own homemade objects, a new study says.
The Surprising Link Between Egg Shape and Bird Flight loading...
The Surprising Link Between Egg Shape and Bird Flight
For the first time, scientists have taken a closer look at how bird eggs are shaped—and made some unexpected discoveries.
About Cardinal

The northern cardinal is so well loved that it has been named the official bird of no fewer than seven U.S. states. Bright red cardinals are easily identified by even casual bird watchers, and are often seen frequenting backyards and bird feeders. When foraging elsewhere the birds eat insects, seeds, grain, fruit, and sap.

Males can be aggressive when defending their territory, and they frequently attack other males who intrude. This tendency sometimes leads cardinals to fly into glass windows, when they charge an "intruding bird" that is really their own reflection.

Fast Facts 

Type: Bird

Diet: Omnivore

Average life span in the wild: 15 years

Size: 8 to 9 in (21 to 23 cm)

Weight: 1.5 to 1.8 oz (42 to 51 g)

Did you know? Unlike many songbirds, both male and female cardinals sing, and the female often vocalizes with song from her nest.

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