New Feathered Dinosaur Had Four Wings but Couldn't Fly loading...
New Feathered Dinosaur Had Four Wings but Couldn't Fly
In a surprise for paleontologists, the well-preserved fossil suggests that the animal spent its life scampering around on the forest floor.
This New Parrot Species Sounds Like a Hawk loading...
This New Parrot Species Sounds Like a Hawk
A new study says the bright, noisy bird have escaped notice in Mexico's Yucatán forests—but parrot experts are sceptical.
In a First, Bird Uses Tools to Make Sweet Music loading...
In a First, Bird Uses Tools to Make Sweet Music
The palm cockatoo is the only species aside from humans that can drum a rhythmic beat with its own homemade objects, a new study says.
The Surprising Link Between Egg Shape and Bird Flight loading...
The Surprising Link Between Egg Shape and Bird Flight
For the first time, scientists have taken a closer look at how bird eggs are shaped—and made some unexpected discoveries.
Baby Bird from Time of Dinosaurs Found Fossilised in Amber loading...
Baby Bird from Time of Dinosaurs Found Fossilised in Amber
The 99-million-year-old hatchling from the Cretaceous Period is the best preserved of its kind.
Ravens Hold Grudges Against Cheaters loading...
Ravens Hold Grudges Against Cheaters
The canny corvids remember people who give them unfair deals, scientists have discovered.
About Common Loon

Named for their clumsy, awkward appearance when walking on land, common loons are migratory birds which breed in forested lakes and large ponds in northern North America and parts of Greenland and Iceland. 

Their unusual cries, which vary from wails to tremolos to yodels, are distinct to individuals and can be heard at great distances. Loon cries are most prevalent during breeding season as pairs aggressively defend their territories.

Fast Facts 

Type: Bird

Diet: Carnivore

Average life span in the wild: 30 years

Size: 2 to 3 ft (66 to 91 cm)

Weight: 6.5 to 12 lbs (3 to 5 kg)

Group name: Flock

Did you know? Loons can dive more than 200 ft (61 m) below the surface of the water in search of food.

 

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