About Dodo

The dodo species evolved from a flock of pigeons that landed on the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. It was likely to have first been spotted by humans in 1598 when settlers landed on Mauritius.

As no complete specimens exist, its appearance is difficult to determine. Most scientists believe the dodo was grey or brown with a grey head and yellowish legs.

Until it was discovered by humans the dodo had no natural predators so it never evolved any defences against other animals. Its inability to fly made the dodo easy pickings for settlers’ domesticated animals.

The extinct dodo bird was last confirmed to be sighted in 1662. Its closest living relative is the Nicobar Pigeon, a smaller flying bird from the southern Pacific.

Scientists are hopeful that it will one day be possible to reintroduce extinct species, including the dodo, back into the wild.

Scroll through the videos, photos and articles below to find out more about dodos.

Scientists’ Top Picks Of Extinct Species loading...
Scientists’ Top Picks Of Extinct Species
Dodos and dinos are emblems of extinction, but there are many other unsung species no longer among us.
Rescuing the Rep of the Dodo loading...
Rescuing the Rep of the Dodo
The derogatory catch phrase "Dumb as a Dodo" has lived for more than 350 years; emerging science may slowly reshape our understanding and give the long-dead bird some respect.
The Extinct Dodos Evolutionary Ancestors loading...
The Extinct Dodos Evolutionary Ancestors
Scientists have determined, through DNA analysis that the long-extinct dodo belongs in the dove and pigeon family.

Newsletter

Never miss a Nat Geo moment

Your email address
Submit