Hidden Danger Lurking under New Zealand loading...
Hidden Danger Lurking under New Zealand
What’s boiling underneath the surface?
Frozen Clocks and Radiation Mark Fukushima's Abandoned Towns loading...
Frozen Clocks and Radiation Mark Fukushima's Abandoned Towns
Returning evacuees grapple with the 2011 disaster’s legacy and wonder if it is safe.
Japan Earthquake Vibrations Nearly Reached Space loading...
Japan Earthquake Vibrations Nearly Reached Space
Amplified sound waves shook Earth's upper atmosphere, study says.
About Earthquake

Earthquakes, also called temblors, can be so tremendously destructive, it’s hard to imagine they occur by the thousands every day around the world, usually in the form of small tremors.

Some 80 percent of all the planet's earthquakes occur along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, called the "Ring of Fire" because of the preponderance of volcanic activity there as well. Most earthquakes occur at fault zones, where tectonic plates—giant rock slabs that make up the Earth's upper layer—collide or slide against each other. These impacts are usually gradual and unnoticeable on the surface; however, immense stress can build up between plates. When this stress is released quickly, it sends massive vibrations, called seismic waves, often hundreds of miles through the rock and up to the surface. Other quakes can occur far from faults zones when plates are stretched or squeezed.

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