Extinction Sucks: Education Worksheet

Video highlights from Extinction Sucks

SCHOOL LEVEL: Upper Primary, Junior Secondary, Senior Secondary

SCHOOL LEVEL          
Upper Primary
Junior Secondary
Senior Secondary

EDUCATION DESCRIPTION
According to the World Resources Institute, 100 different animal species are made extinct around the world daily. Habitat loss, poaching and illegal trade push animals to the edge. But it’s not all doom and gloom. Follow the funky Perth-based conservationist, Aleisha, and her vibrant friend, Ashleigh, as they take charge and do whatever it takes to help endangered animals. In this rollicking, six-part adventure series, they race against time, raising awareness and hard cash, mounting challenging expeditions to meet the animals, educate locals and present much needed equipment to conservationists.

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION
As the human population swells, survival odds for other species diminish. Competition for limited habitat and resources, pollution and illegal poaching have tragic consequences for many animals. This series is packed with information about the lives and plight of six different species in their unique habitats – Australia’s Tasmanian Devil, India’s Asian elephant, Nepal’s Indian rhinoceros, Thailand’s Asiatic black bear, sea turtles and New Zealand’s Hector’s dolphin.  It also bubbles with adventure, discovery and fun.

Rather than divorcing the animals’ survival challenges from daily life, the series’ energetic hosts, Aleisha and Ashleigh, take into account the moral, ethical and social implications surrounding conservation issues. Competing interests – be they economic, cultural or social – are examined and discussed. The two young women dream up practical ways of helping, then set about raising money to achieve their goals. Finally, they travel to the endangered animals’ habitats to see the situation for themselves, provide some practical form of education for locals, and hand over the specialised equipment they’ve bought.

Each of the six episodes stands alone, and each finishes on a positive note with a call to action. Aleisha and Ashleigh are everyday people, who relate as easily to local school children as they do to scientists and conservationists.

Along with the biology and ecology strands of each episode, elements of geography, technology, and socio-economics are woven. In this way, the series achieves a more complete understanding of the complexities of conservation issues.

The series explores both marine and terrestrial environments, and demonstrates the interrelated nature of our world. Most importantly, it inspires students to take responsibility for conserving their world.

CURRICULUM POINTERS

Upper Primary Curriculum
Science is a dynamic, collaborative and creative human endeavour arising from our curiosity and interest in making sense of our world through exploring the unknown, investigating universal mysteries, making predictions and solving problems.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale

In Years 5–6 the curriculum focus is on geographical investigation leading to involvement. Students have a growing interest in their community, and can apply this to investigations into how their community manages environmental, social and planning issues.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011 Page 25/77


Junior Secondary Curriculum
The science curriculum addresses the diverse needs of Australian students by providing them with scientific knowledge, understandings and skills to make informed and responsible personal, social, technological and environmental decisions that impact at the local, national and global levels and to participate, if they so wish, in science-rich careers.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale

Each year, from Years 7-10, has two sets of core ideas about specific characteristics through which students will cumulatively learn about the basic patterns, processes and principles that explain the geography of their world. One set focuses on the environmental characteristics of places, but also explores related human themes and the other focuses on their human characteristics, but also explores environmental themes.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Page 25/77


Senior Secondary Curriculum
Structural, functional and behavioural adaptations that enhance an organism’s survival, including: environmental factors and challenges that affect the way organisms meet their requirements for life, including obtaining nutrients, water and gases; disposal of wastes; shelter; and protection
Australian Science (Biology) Curriculum 2010: Page 4

The senior years should also have an applied focus on trends, planning, management and futures, as is appropriate for students nearing the end of their school years and approaching adulthood, particularly those not intending to undertake university study.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011:  Page 29/93

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES

Upper Primary

In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will:
•     Develop an interest in science and a curiosity and willingness to explore, ask questions and speculate about the changing world
•    Communicate scientific understandings and findings
•    Develop an understanding of historical and cultural aspects of science
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•     Understand how they can influence the futures of places
•    Develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, knowledge and interest about the variety of environments, peoples, cultures and places that exist throughout the world
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011 Page 17/54


Junior Secondary

In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will:
•     Ask questions and speculate about the changing world
•    Investigate questions about the world using scientific inquiry methods, including questioning, planning and … investigations based on ethical principles, collecting and analysing data, evaluating results, and drawing critical, evidence-based conclusions
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•     Develop an ability to ask geographical questions, and reach conclusions based on evidence and logical reasoning, and communicate their findings in effective ways
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011 Page 17/54


Senior Secondary

In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will:
•    Develop an ability to communicate scientific understandings and findings to a range of audiences, justify their own ideas on the basis of evidence, and to evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims whilst respecting alternative viewpoints and beliefs

•    Select and integrate science understanding in order to explain and predict phenomena, apply that understanding to new situations and events, and appreciate the dynamic nature of science knowledge.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Become thoughtful and active local, national and global citizens, and to understand how they can influence the futures of places.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011 page 17/54


STUDENT LEARNING TASKS

Upper Primary

Task 1
Download a map of the world from
http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/print-collection/world-map-classic.html
Save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.
On your map use colour to shade the following regions:
•    Cape York Peninsula
•    Gulf of Carpentaria
•    Tasmania
•    South Vietnam
•    Southern India
•    Nepal
•    South Island of New Zealand.

On your map, write the name of each of these endangered animals next to the shaded region in which it lives:
•    Asian Elephant
•    Asiatic Black Bear
•    Indian Rhinoceros
•    Hector’s Dolphin
•    Sea Turtle
•    Tasmanian Devil.


Task 2
Choose your favourite animal from the Extinction Sucks series. Do an illustration of this animal. On your drawing label five distinctive physical characteristics of this animal that help it to survive in the wild.

Task 3
What is the diet of this animal you have chosen? Explain how it forages for its food or hunts its prey.

Task 4
List three factors that have caused this animal to be at risk of extinction. Now, write three ways in which this animal can be protected and preserved.


Junior Secondary

Task 1
Download a map of the world from
http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/print-collection/world-map-classic.html
Save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.
On your map, mark the regions Ashleigh and Aleisha visited which are the natural habitats for the following endangered animals:
•    Asian Elephant
•    Asiatic Black Bear
•    Indian Rhinoceros
•    Hector’s Dolphin
•    Sea Turtles
•    Tasmanian Devil


Task 2
Draw up a two column table. In the first column, make a list of ten endangered animals. In the second column write the major factor that has contributed to this animal being on the brink of extinction. For example, Asiatic black bears face extinction because they are captured and milked for bile.


Task 3
Select an endangered species you would like to save. Describe its natural habitat, physical characteristics, diet and hunting behaviour.


Task 4
Write a 150-word newspaper article explaining how technology can help save endangered animals. Refer to specific new technology innovations and the way the in which it helps to preserve endangered species.


Senior Secondary

Task 1
Each year, one million sea creatures die from plastic rubbish in the ocean. Explain what marine debris is and from where it originates. Finally, suggest an international protocol that could help to reduce the amount of marine debris existing in our oceans.


Task 2
Choose an endangered animal. Research and report on the work scientists are doing to save this species from extinction. Write a 200-word summary that includes references to individuals and/or organisations that are campaigning to save the animal of your choice.

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