Islands: Education Worksheet

Video highlights from Islands

Upper Primary, Junior and Senior Secondary

Islands Education Worksheet

EPISODES IN THIS SERIES
Fiji, Cuba, Cyprus, the Galapagos, Iceland and Zanzibar.

EDUCATION SHEET EPISODE
Galapagos

SCHOOL LEVEL
Upper Primary
Junior Secondary and Senior Secondary


EDUCATION DESCRIPTION: Galapagos
The Galapagos Archipelago, forged from volcanic eruptions deep beneath the sea floor, lay for millennia in splendid isolation. Its once barren shores were slowly colonized, firstly by wind-borne seeds and migrating birds, then by land creatures that arrived on driftwood, washed up on the debris of continental floods. The islands’ plant and animal life has evolved in unique ways, and studying them inspired Charles Darwin to write On the Origin of Species. More recently, the archipelago’s fast expanding human population and booming tourism industry have brought the future of this treasured natural laboratory into the spotlight.


TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION
The Galapagos Islands form one of the planet’s most spectacular geographical wonders. Coming across the islands in 1835 as he sailed home to Britain from South America, Charles Darwin realised there was something profound about the nature of life here. He eventually transformed his observations into the theory of evolution. On the Origin of Species challenged traditionally held beliefs about natural history and put the Galapagos on the map.

In the last 50 years, life on the Galapagos Archipelago has changed dramatically as wave after wave of new residents arrives. Initially, Galapagos settlers wanted a simpler, better way of life, proximity to nature – and freedom. In 1968, the Ecuadorian government, which administers the Galapagos, preserved 97% of the islands’ landmass as national park. Word of the islands’ beauty spread and a fledgling tourist industry emerged. Now, more than 22,000 people live here, mostly Ecuadorian immigrants who serve the islands’ 150,000 annual visitors. Tourism is the islands’ biggest earner, but does it threaten the future of the endemic plants and animals?

The Galapagos Marine Reserve preserves 133,000 sq. km of ocean, some of Earth’s most pristine waters, and home to 3000 marine plant and animal species. Whilst vigilantly controlled, and with industrial fishing banned, illegal trawling presents ongoing challenges. Shark fins, a delicacy in Asia that fetches high prices, tempt many fishers.

Galapagos is a thought-provoking program. Magnificent footage of the islands, including their unique geological formations, their flora and fauna, interaction between people and wildlife, is interwoven with heartfelt comments from local inhabitants, including biologists, tourism operators and government officials. The overarching message is the urgent need to find a balance between people and the natural world. In the Galapagos Islands, where the environment supports a unique evolutionary process, protective conservation action is especially critical.


CURRICULUM POINTERS

Upper Primary Curriculum
Geography teaching nurtures students’ curiosity about places and the differences between them. It responds to their wonder about the world and its diversity, and teaches them how to explore this world directly through fieldwork and indirectly through other types of investigation.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Introduction


Junior Secondary Curriculum
Geography answers our questions about why places have their particular environmental and human characteristics; how and why these characteristics vary from place to place; how places are connected, and how and why they are changing. Geography examines these questions on all scales, from the local to the global, and over time periods that range from a few years to thousands of years. It also looks forward to explore ways of influencing and managing the future of places including their environmental, economic and social sustainability.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Introduction


Senior Secondary Curriculum
Geography shows students ways in which they can positively influence their world as active local, national and global citizens by encouraging them to question why things are the way they are, to investigate issues and to evaluate alternative, more sustainable futures. Through exploration and discussion, students develop an informed view of their responsibilities towards the environment and to people throughout the world.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Introduction


CURRICULUM OUTCOMES

Upper Primary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, knowledge and interest about the variety of
environments, peoples, cultures and places that exist throughout the world, providing students with a sound geographical knowledge
•    Explore and gain a good understanding of geographical thinking including its perspectives, concepts and ways of explaining.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims


Junior Secondary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Explore and gain a good understanding of geographical thinking including its perspectives, concepts and ways of explaining
•    Become thoughtful and active local, national and global citizens, and … understand how they can influence the futures of places
•    Develop [their] ability to ask geographical questions, plan an inquiry, collect and analyse information, (particularly through fieldwork and spatial technologies), reach conclusions based on evidence and logical reasoning, and communicate their findings in effective ways.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims


Senior Secondary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Become thoughtful and active local, national and global citizens, and … understand how they can influence the futures of places
•    Develop [their] ability to ask geographical questions, plan an inquiry, collect and analyse information … reach conclusions based on evidence and logical reasoning, and communicate their findings in effective ways
•    Build the confident and creative use of geographical skills, and … use these skills to extend their knowledge; make sense of new situations, and to solve problems.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims


STUDENT LEARNING TASKS

Upper Primary

Task 1
Download a map of the Galapagos Islands from
http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/samerica/galap.htm
Click on the map to enlarge it, then save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.

On your map:
•    Highlight Santa Cruz Island, and Puerto Ayora, where most Galapagos people live.
•    Highlight the Equator and the name of the island it passes through.
•    Circle the capital city of the Galapagos Islands.
•    Highlight the islands with airplane icons that show where Galapagos flights land.

Task 2
Name five different animals that live only on the Galapagos Islands and nowhere else. Write down whether they are terrestrial (live on land) or marine (live in the water). Write a sentence for each animal to explain what might happen to it if too many people go to the Galapagos Islands.

Task 3
Choose one of the Galapagos Islands and do some Internet research to find answers to the following questions:

•    What is the name of the island you chose?
•    How big is the island (in sq. km)?
•    Describe in one paragraph what the island looks like – geology, topography etc.
•    How many people live on the island?
•    Name three different animals that live on the island.
•    Name three things that tourists who visit the island can do there.

Task 4
Write a list of seven golden rules for people who live on, or visit, the Galapagos Islands to help keep the plants and animals safe.  


Junior Secondary

Task 1
Download a map of the Galapagos Islands from
http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/samerica/galap.htm
Click on the map to enlarge it, then save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.

On your map:
•    Highlight Santa Cruz Island, and Puerto Ayora, where most Galapagos people live.
•    Highlight the Equator and the name of the island it passes through.
•    Circle the capital city of the Galapagos Islands.
•    Highlight the islands with airplane icons that show where Galapagos flights land.
•    Name the nearest landfall at all four points of the compass and their approximate distance from the Galapagos.
•    Name the ocean in which the Galapagos Islands are situated.

Task 2
Draw a timeline for the Galapagos Islands. You may need to do some Internet research to find dates for the following information:

•    The islands are formed
•    First known European discovery of the islands
•    Ecuador annexes the islands, naming them the Archipelago of Ecuador
•    The islands provide sheltered anchorage for pirates, sealers and whalers
•    Beginning of scientific exploration of the islands
•    Charles Darwin visits the islands
•    Patrick Watkins, marooned on Isla Santa Maria, becomes the first resident
•    Ecuador officially claims the Galapagos Archipelago
•    Some islands are declared wildlife sanctuaries
•    97% of the archipelago officially becomes a national park
•    Organized tourism begins

Task 3
Imagine you work for a tour company on the Galapagos Islands. Many visitors are curious about how the islands were formed and why they look different from each other. Design a brochure that could be given to visitors. Brochures should include the following:
•    A description of how the Galapagos Islands were formed; this should be at least one paragraph
•    An illustration or map showing the process by which the Galapagos Islands were formed
•    A description and comparison of the islands of Fernandina, Isabela, Santa Cruz, and Española (at least one paragraph each), including what people can do there.
•    A list of ten rules visitors must observe in order to protect the islands’ plants and animals.

Task 4
Choose three environmental problems the Galapagos Archipelago is facing today. Write 50 words about each of them, including what the problem is, how urgently it needs to be fixed and what is being done to find a solution.


Senior Secondary

Task 1
Tourism is the main source of income for the Galapagos Islands, however it is a double-edged sword. In 200 words discuss the pros and cons of Galapagos tourism. Make sure you back up your discussion with facts and figures.

Task 2
Shark finning has been described as an act of barbarity. Write 250 words to explain the how the finning industry works, its impact on the environment and economy of the Galapagos Islands, and what can be done to mitigate this destructive practice.

 

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