London Olympic Stadium Education Worksheet - Teacher Notes

Video highlights from London Olympic Stadium

Upper Primary and Junior Secondary

TELEVISION SERIES        
Megastructures

LEARNING TASK EPISODE    
London Olympic Stadium

EPISODES IN THIS SERIES    
London Olympic Stadium

LEARNING LEVEL            
Upper Primary and Junior Secondary

CURRICULUM RELEVANCE    
Technology, Geography, Science


PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION FOR TEACHERS
The eyes of the world are now focused on a sporting megastructure – the 80,000-seat athletics stadium that will be centre stage of London’s Olympic Games site. By day it will be the venue for all track and field events and, by night, a dazzling stage for London’s opening and closing ceremonies. This isn't just a place where world records will be set. In the past, bigger was better, and the 2008 Beijing Olympics push the boundaries for size and spectacle to the limits. In stark contrast, London’s Olympic stadium represents a milestone in sporting architecture, designed to be dismantled and downsized to a 25,000-seat athletic venue after the Games. But creating a stadium that's lighter and tighter is a massive undertaking, fraught with challenges. The venue must be completed on time and within the budget. Will London have an Olympic arena to be proud of? Or will this go down in history as the stadium that failed to impress?


BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS
London won its bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games with a promise of greener, better, less wasteful production. Past Olympic host cities have found that giant stadiums are expensive to maintain once the Games have finished, and don’t attract crowds. The concept of a demountable stadium was the cornerstone of London’s eco-friendly bid and an engineering adventure into the unknown. The unique design of the sporting amphitheatre is for a stadium that can be bolted together and taken apart, like a giant Meccano set. But Team Stadium – architects, engineers, planning and construction experts at the top of their game – must overcome some huge challenges, including freak weather, extreme engineering and an unforeseen financial meltdown.

Before construction can begin, the design must be finalized and approved, and the site – a 2.5km derelict wasteland north of the Thames in London’s East End – must be cleansed of industrial toxic waste. In addition to knocking down some 200 old buildings and factories and rehabilitating 800,000 tonnes of soil, the subterranean area must be checked for unexploded ordinance – deadly souvenirs from World War II.

The challenge for Team Stadium is to design a large yet stylish demountable venue, which is stiff but light, elegant and deliverable. By splitting the stadium into parts, separating the upper temporary structure from the permanent track and lower seating area, the team can meet the planning application deadline for one part of the stadium and buy some thinking time for the rest.

Seen through the eyes of the team leaders, the incredible story of the design and construction of a revolutionary sports stadium makes for gripping viewing. In a race against time and in the face of extreme challenges, including icy temperatures and withdrawal of sponsorship funding, time-lapse photography helps to reveal this amazing accomplishment in architecture, engineering and technology.


CURRICULUM POINTERS
 

Upper Primary Curriculum
People design and use technologies to shape the world in which we live. Technologies increasingly enrich and impact on the lives of people, culture and society globally. It is important that, as a nation, we make connections between technologies, creativity and enterprise as a catalyst for 21st century innovation. We will increasingly depend upon contemporary or emerging technologies, for agriculture, communication, construction, energy and water management, knowledge creation, manufacture, and transportation.
Australian Technologies K-10 Curriculum 2010: Introduction

The geographical characteristics of places studied include, but are not limited to, people, climate, production, landforms, built environment, soils, vegetation, communities, water resources, cultures, mineral resources and landscape. Some characteristics are tangible, such as rivers and buildings. Others are intangible, such as scenic quality and socioeconomic status.
Australian Geography K-10 Curriculum 2011: Introduction

Science provides an empirical way of answering interesting questions about the biological, physical and technological world. The knowledge it produces has proved to be a reliable basis for action in our personal, social and economic lives.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale


Junior Secondary Curriculum
Technologies challenge us to learn to adapt to new developments and critically examine how they transform and influence our ideas, opportunities and actions. Technologies, in both their development and use, are influenced by and can play a role in transforming society and our natural, constructed and virtual environments. We create, as well as respond to, the designed world in which we live.
Australian Technologies K-10 Curriculum 2010: Introduction

Geography shows students ways in which they can positively influence their world as active local, national and global citizens by encouraging them to question why things are the way they are, to investigate issues and to evaluate alternative, more sustainable futures. Through exploration and discussion, students develop an informed view of their responsibilities towards the environment and to people throughout the world.
Australian Geography K-10 Curriculum 2011: Introduction

The science curriculum provides opportunities for students to develop understandings about science and its processes, the scope of its contributions to our culture and society, and its applications in our daily lives. The science curriculum addresses the diverse needs of Australian students by providing them with scientific knowledge, understandings and skills to make informed and responsible personal, social, technological and environmental decisions that impact at the local, national and global levels and to participate, if they so wish, in science-rich careers.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Introduction



CURRICULUM OUTCOMES
 

Upper Primary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Technology will develop:
•    the technologies knowledge, understanding and skills to engage purposefully in the process of creating preferred futures by using a range of thinking skills, including futures and systems thinking, to generate and communicate creative ideas.
•    practical application of design and computational thinking and traditional, contemporary and emerging technologies to produce effective solutions within personal, family, community and global settings that are meaningful and culturally authentic to those settings.
Australian Technologies K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims

In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, knowledge and interest about the variety of environments, peoples, cultures and places that exist throughout the world
•    enable students to explore and gain a good understanding of geographical thinking including its perspectives, concepts and ways of explaining
Australian Geography K-10 Curriculum 2011: Aims
In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will develop:
•    an interest in science and a curiosity and willingness to explore, ask questions and speculate about the changing world in which they live
•    an ability to communicate their scientific understandings and findings to a range of audiences, to justify their own ideas on the basis of evidence, and to evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims whilst respecting alternative viewpoints and beliefs.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


Junior Secondary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Technology will:
•    critique, evaluate and apply thinking skills and technologies processes that people use to shape their world, and to transfer that learning to other technology situations
•    engage confidently with and make informed, ethical decisions about technologies for personal wellbeing, recreation, everyday life, the world of work and preferred futures.
Australian Technologies K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims

In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    develop students’ ability to ask geographical questions, plan an inquiry, collect and analyse information, (particularly through fieldwork and spatial technologies), reach conclusions based on evidence and logical reasoning, and communicate their findings in effective ways
•    build the confident and creative use of geographical skills, and to enable students to use these skills to extend their knowledge; make sense of new situations, and to solve problems.
Australian Geography K-10 Curriculum 2011: Aims

In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will develop:
•    an interest in science and a curiosity and willingness to explore, ask questions and speculate about the changing world in which they live
•    an ability to communicate their scientific understandings and findings to a range of audiences, to justify their own ideas on the basis of evidence, and to evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims whilst respecting alternative viewpoints and beliefs
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2011: Aims
 

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