Rebuilding Titanic Education Worksheet

Video highlights from Rebuilding Titanic

School Level - Upper Primary and Junior Secondary

EDUCATION DESCRIPTION


The story of the Titanic is one of history’s greatest maritime legends. When the mighty ship sets sail in April 1912, she is the largest, heaviest, most expensive, and most luxurious manmade moving object on the planet. This documentary tells the incredible tale of how the Titanic was built – and who built it. To bring the story to life, a team of modern-day engineers builds iconic sections of the world's most famous ship, using the industrial methods of a hundred years ago. In doing so, they explore the shipyards and factories involved, delve into archival records, meet descendants of Titanic workers, and gain an extraordinary insight into the cultural, social and political events of the early twentieth century.


TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION


In 1909 at Harland and Wollf’s shipyard in Belfast, Northern Ireland, the construction of the Titanic’s massive hull begins. There is no modern machinery and no control systems to assist the 4000 shipbuilders, who work without occupational health and safety rules. Industrial Britain is a dangerous place where time is money, men are machines, and deaths at work are common. Belfast, the ‘silicon valley’ of its day, is the only place in the world capable of producing a ship the size of the Titanic, and eight men die during her construction.


Rivets are the superglue of the industrial age, used in every steel structure from trains to bridges. Amongst Titanic’s staggering statistics, three million rivets are required to hold her metal components together. Her bow anchor, the world’s biggest, is ordered in October 1910 from Noah Hingley and Son, Netherton, England, along with 540 metres of chain. Each link in the chain is the size of a man’s torso.



The days of traditional construction require finely honed skills, hard physical work and ability, keen eye judgement, tolerance and endurance. Boys begin their training aged 14 and work until they die, often in their 40s. Women work in mills and factories, making Titanic’s interior furnishings, linen and hand painted china. Their babies and children are by their sides. The work is long and hard, the stakes high and the pay pathetic. 


David Wilkes – a steelworker who has built skyscrapers; design engineer, Yewande Akinola; former aerospace engineer, Brendan Walker; and Luke Perry, industrial artist and traditional metalworker join forces to rebuild the leading edge of the Titanic’s bow and her anchor. Their goal is to create lasting memorials to the men, women and children who built the Titanic. In doing so, they bring the history behind the Titanic to life as they visit the original shipyards, dry dock and anchor manufacturers, meet a number of historians, talk to descendants of the ship’s workers and examine fascinating archival images and footage of the world’s most famous ship.


 
CURRICULUM POINTERS


Upper Primary Curriculum


History is a disciplined inquiry into the past that develops students' curiosity and imagination. It develops understanding of cultural, social and political events, processes and issues that have shaped humanity from earliest times. It enriches our appreciation of how the world and its people have changed, and the significant continuities that exist into the present.
Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale


Junior Secondary Curriculum


History is a disciplined inquiry into the past that develops students' curiosity and imagination. It develops understanding of cultural, social and political events, processes and issues that have shaped humanity from earliest times. It enriches our appreciation of how the world and its people have changed, and the significant continuities that exist into the present.
Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale


 

CURRICULUM OUTCOMES


Upper Primary


In undertaking these tasks, students of History will:


• Develop interest in, and enjoyment of, historical study
• Develop knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the past and the forces that shape societies
• Understand and use historical concepts
• Undertake historical inquiry, including skills in the analysis and use of sources, communication and explanation.
Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims



Junior Secondary


In undertaking these tasks, students of History will:


• Process and synthesise historical information from a variety of sources, including historical data
• Identify and analyse the different actions, motives, values and attitudes of people from the past
• Sequence events chronologically to demonstrate the relationship between events in different periods and places
• Use historical terms and concepts
Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010, page 24


 


STUDENT LEARNING TASKS


Upper Primary



Task 1


Download a map of the Titanic’s resting place from
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0412/feature5/images/mp_download.5.pdf


Save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.


Use the information on the map to answer the following questions:


• Name the country and port from which Titanic departed
• Which ocean did the Titanic have to cross to reach her destination?
• To which city and country was the Titanic heading?
• On what date did the Titanic sink?
• How deep is the water where the remains of the Titanic now lie?


 


Task 2


Use the Internet to find out the following facts about the Titanic. Use a conversion table to change imperial measurements to metric.


• Flag of Registry
• Length of ship
• Beam (width)
• Height
• Displacement (weight)
• Number of propellers
• Number of boilers
• Number of funnels
• Top speed
• Number of rivets
• Cost to build
• Number of crew
• Number of passengers
• Number of lifeboats


 


Task 3


Name three different jobs you could do in 1909 if you were a man, and three different jobs you could do if you were a woman working on the construction of the Titanic. For each of these jobs, write a sentence to describe what was involved.



Task 4


Write a paragraph to explain how coal mining was connected to building and sailing the Titanic. In your answer name five different jobs that could not have been undertaken without coal.


 


Task 5


• Name three pieces of machinery or equipment on the Titanic that are no longer used today. Explain what each of these was used for.


• Name three machines used in shipbuilding today that had not been invented 100 years ago. Explain what each of these machines does and how it has made shipbuilding safer and/or easier.


 

Junior Secondary



Task 1


Draw a timeline that shows the dates of these historical events:


• Construction of the Titanic begins
• Launch of Titanic’s hull
• Completion of outfitting of Titanic
• Departure of Titanic from Southampton, UK
• Collision of Titanic with iceberg
• Arrival in New York of rescue ship Carpathia with Titanic survivors
• Discovery by Dr Robert Ballard of the wreck of the Titanic on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean
• First tourist dive to the wreck of the Titanic.
 


 
Task 2


Imagine you are a riveter working on the Titanic at Harland and Wolff’s shipyard in 1910 and answer the following.


• In a couple of sentences, explain what your job involves.
• What time do you start work?
• What time do you finish?
• What time are your breaks and how long do they last?
• What is the maximum time you can spend on a toilet break?
• How much are you paid for your work?
• What are three different reasons for being fined at work?
• How much is an average fine?
• What do you wear to protect you in your work?
• Within the strict rules and discipline of the shipyard, what can and your fellow workmates do to make your job more fun?


 


Task 3


Write a paragraph to explain what a rivet is, why rivets were so important to the construction industry in the early 1900s, why they were of particular significance in building the Titanic, and three features of a quality rivet.


 


Task 4


What are five advantages and three disadvantages of using coal to generate energy for industry? Name five ways energy was generated before coal mining started.


 


Task 5


Write three paragraphs to explain how the Compensation Act of 1906, unionisation and Occupational Health and Safety regulations have improved workplace conditions.

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