Titanic 100 James Cameron's Final Word Education Worksheet

Video highlights from Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron

Upper Primary and Junior Secondary

Titanic 100 James Cameron's Final Word Education Worksheet


SCHOOL LEVEL

Upper Primary and Junior Secondary


EDUCATION DESCRIPTION: Titanic 100: The Final Word with James Cameron

James Cameron, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and director of the Oscar award winning film Titanic, leads a fascinating investigation to mark the 100th anniversary of the Titanic tragedy. Joined by a team of Titanic experts from around the world, including naval architects, engineers, historians and artists, Cameron’s goal is to reveal how and why the ‘unsinkable’ Titanic sank. With their combined expertise, the Titanic team reveals new facts discovered by cutting edge technology and other means since the film’s 1997 release. An investigation of this magnitude has never been attempted before, and some of the revelations may alter the fundamental interpretation of what exactly happened to the Titanic on April 14, 1912.



TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION


James Cameron defines history as a “consensus hallucination”. Applied to the world’s most famous shipwreck, his definition holds some weight, given the countless ideas and theories concerning the fate of the Titanic. While most of us know the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank beneath the North Atlantic’s frigid waters, the events that followed have been open to interpretation. How did the ship broke up, sink and hit the bottom of the ocean floor, and why did she sink so fast? Armed with deck plans, survivor testimonies and footage of the wreck, James Cameron and eight of the world’s leading Titanic specialists piece together, as precisely as possible, what happened.



In 1912, Titanic was the largest ship ever built: 269m long, some 20 storeys high, weighing more than 46,000 tons. Her hull spanned four city blocks, with nine decks and accommodation for 3547 people. Mechanically she was state-of-the-art, with an innovative double-bottomed keel and 16 watertight compartments. According to her builders, even in worst possible accident at sea, Titanic was unsinkable.



One hundred years later, Cameron works backwards to reconstruct what happened. It takes two and a half hours to descend by submersible to the eternal darkness where the wreck of the Titanic lies in thousands of broken pieces. Cameron’s first job is to find the hypocentre – ground zero for the disaster ¬–¬ where the heaviest and most uniform objects cluster– to define where the ship broke at the surface. Intriguingly, however, it is the outliers – three pieces of the wreck whose placement on the debris field map doesn’t make sense – that are of prime significance.



Using mini, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) with hair-thin, fibre-optic cables that send live video feedback to manned submersibles, Cameron has accumulated hundreds of hours of archaeological survey footage from inside the wreck. Combining this evidence with computer generated modelling and 3D animation, Cameron seeks input from his team of experts to piece together the incredible events that occurred before, during and after the sinking of the Titanic.




CURRICULUM POINTERS


Upper Primary Curriculum

History, as a discipline, has its own methods and procedures that make it different from other ways of understanding human experience. Historical study is based on the evidence of the remains of the past. It is interpretative by nature, promotes debate and encourages thinking about human values, including present and future challenges.

Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale



Junior Secondary Curriculum

[History] develops transferable skills associated with the process of historical inquiry, including the ability to: ask relevant questions, critically analyse and interpret sources, consider context, respect and explain different perspectives, develop and substantiate interpretations, and communicate effectively.

Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale




CURRICULUM OUTCOMES


Upper Primary

In undertaking these tasks, students of History will develop:

•    interest in, and enjoyment of, historical study for lifelong learning and work,

•    capacity to undertake historical inquiry, including skills in the analysis and use of sources, communication and explanation.

Australian History K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


Junior Secondary

In undertaking these tasks, students of History will develop:

•    understanding and use of historical concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, significance, empathy, perspectives and contestability

•    capacity to undertake historical inquiry, including skills in the analysis and use of sources, communication and explanation.

Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims



STUDENT LEARNING TASKS
 

Upper Primary


Task 1

Draw to rough scale a picture of the Titanic before she sank. Mark the length, height and weight of the ship on your picture and make sure you include the correct number of funnels. Draw a line to show where the experts believe the ship broke before she sank.



Task 2

Choose three of the Titanic experts and describe in 20 words for each how they contributed to James Cameron’s investigation of the Titanic tragedy.


Task 3

Write 50 words to explain why you think people all over the world are so interested in the story of the Titanic.


Task 4

If James Cameron was going to make another film about the Titanic, using the most up-to-date information, what is the most important change he should make? Explain your choice in 75 words.



Task 5

In 100 words, describe what you think could have been done to save more lives on the Titanic after she hit the iceberg.



Junior Secondary


Task 1

Write a definition to explain the meaning of ‘outliers’ as they relate to the wreck of the Titanic. Then describe in about 75 words why they were important to solving the mystery of the Titanic’s sinking.


Task 2
In spite of eye-witness reports to the contrary, many people believe that the Titanic sank in one piece. Write 50 words to explain why this is so, and another 50 to show how we now know for certain that it’s not true.


Task 3
Name three mistakes James Cameron made in his 1997 feature film about the Titanic. For each of these, write 50 words to correct the mistake.



Task 4
Choose one piece of technology used in the James Cameron’s investigation of the Titanic and in 100 words describe how it helped to solve the mystery.


Task 5
In your own words (about 150), explain what happened to the Titanic, according to the outcome of the investigation, after she hit the iceberg.


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