Egyptian Giant Solpugid (Camel Spider)

Spider Catches Prey by Shooting Webs loading...
Spider Catches Prey by Shooting Webs
The rare ability helps some spiders outwit larger prey.
Watch a Spider Take Down a Scorpion Twice Its Size loading...
Watch a Spider Take Down a Scorpion Twice Its Size
The video was taken by a man in Australia who stumbled upon the battling critters in his bathroom.
Watch: Giant Wasp vs. Giant Spider Battle Ends With a Twist loading...
Watch: Giant Wasp vs. Giant Spider Battle Ends With a Twist
Video taken in Sydney, Australia, shows a large spider wasp carrying a Huntsman spider to its death—until a surprise visitor drops in.
Watch a Giant Spider Devour a Cricket on a Man's Hand loading...
Watch a Giant Spider Devour a Cricket on a Man's Hand
Up close video footage taken in Australia shows how this enormous spider immobilises and consumes its prey.
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Watch a Tarantula Crawl Out of Its Own Skeleton
A time-lapse video shows what happens when a young Mexican Red Knee tarantula is ready to shed its old exoskeleton.
About Egyptian Giant Solpugid (Camel Spider)

Camel spiders became an Internet sensation during the Iraq war of 2003, when rumours of their bloodthirsty nature began to circulate online. Many tales were accompanied with photos purporting to show spiders half the size of a human.

Camel spiders are not deadly to humans (though their bite is painful), but they are vicious predators that can visit death upon insects, rodents, lizards, and small birds. These hardy desert dwellers boast large, powerful jaws, which can be up to one-third of their body length. They use them to seize their victims and turn them to pulp with a chopping or sawing motion. Camel spiders are not venomous, but they do utilise digestive fluids to liquefy their victims' flesh, making it easy to suck the remains into their stomachs.

Fast Facts 

Status: Not assessed

Type: Bug

Diet: Carnivore

Average life span in the wild: Less than one year

Size: 6 in (15 cm)

Weight: 2 oz (56 g)

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