Giraffes Seen Feasting on Skeleton—Here's Why loading...
Giraffes Seen Feasting on Skeleton—Here's Why
An animal behaviour filmed in Africa has a logical explanation, experts say.
How To Save The World's Tallest Animal loading...
How To Save The World's Tallest Animal
Conservationists are working to save giraffes from a "silent extinction".
April the Giraffe Gives Birth–6 Facts You May Not Know About Giraffes loading...
April the Giraffe Gives Birth–6 Facts You May Not Know About Giraffes
See pictures of baby giraffes, and learn more about the world's tallest mammals–which may be in danger of extinction
14 Photos of Giraffes With Their Heads In the Clouds loading...
14 Photos of Giraffes With Their Heads In the Clouds
See majestic photos of the world's tallest mammal.
Extremely Rare White Giraffe Spotted - What Would You Name Her? loading...
Extremely Rare White Giraffe Spotted - What Would You Name Her?
The year-old calf, which lives in Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park, has a condition called leucism.
About Giraffes

One of Africa's most iconic species, the giraffe (Giraffidae camelopardalis), get its name from its camel like body and leopard like coat. With their proportionally long necks and unique patterns they are easy to identify. 

Giraffes belong to the giraffidae family and are the tallest living terrestrial mammal on Earth reaching heights of 5.7 metres. There are 9 sub-species of giraffe that can be found almost all over Africa. 

Giraffes usually live in groups which tend to be sex segregated. Using their long necks, giraffes feed on both trees and shrubs and have a specialized tongue for stripping branches of their leaves. Giraffes feeding patterns can have a significant effect on the evolution of tree species. 

Although giraffes are tall, they give birth standing up, meaning the calf has a long way to fall after birth. The fall breaks the umbilical cord and after a few hours the calf will be able to run around. 

Giraffes long necks aren't only used for feeding on tall trees, some giraffes even use their necks to fight other giraffes. When fighting over territory two male giraffes may bash their necks together until one of them gives in. 

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