Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica loading...
Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica
Cameras attached to humpback whales are giving researchers fresh insight into a rapidly changing Southern Ocean.
14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales loading...
14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales
From a killer whale on the hunt to narwhals touching tusks, we look at some of the most stunning photographs of marine giants.
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World loading...
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World
These 13 photos were among those recognized by the Underwater Photographer of the Year contest, which showcases the best in underwater photography.
Japanese Ship Has Killed A Whale In Australian Waters loading...
Japanese Ship Has Killed A Whale In Australian Waters
Photos released by Sea Shepherd show a dead minke whale on the deck of a ship allegedly in Australian waters.
Mysterious New Whale Species Discovered in Alaska loading...
Mysterious New Whale Species Discovered in Alaska
Scientists say a dead whale on a desolate beach and a skeleton hanging in a high school gym are a new species. Yet experts have never seen one alive.
Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us loading...
Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us
Seven species of the marine mammals have been seen clinging to the dead body of a likely friend or relative, a new study says.
About Gray Whale

Gray whales are often covered with parasites and other organisms that make their snouts and backs look like a crusty ocean rock.

The gray whale is one of the animal kingdom's great migrators. Traveling in groups called pods, some of these giants swim 12,430 miles round-trip from their summer home in Alaskan waters to the warmer waters off the Mexican coast. The whales winter and breed in the shallow southern waters and balmier climate. Other gray whales live in the seas near Korea.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Gray Whale

Scientific Name: Eschrichtius robustus

Type: Mammals

Diet: Omnivores

Group Name: Pod

Size: 40 to 50 ft

Weight: 30 to 40 tons

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