How A Wayward Antarctic Seal Ended Up On A Brazilian Beach loading...
How A Wayward Antarctic Seal Ended Up On A Brazilian Beach
The young animal did not survive its journey, but provided an astonishing case study for biologists.
First-of-Its-Kind Brain Surgery Saves Beloved Fur Seal loading...
First-of-Its-Kind Brain Surgery Saves Beloved Fur Seal
Ziggy Star was found stranded off the coast of California with a debilitating brain disease. Now, she’s back in the water.
Seal's Playful Leap Nearly Knocks Over Kayaker loading...
Seal's Playful Leap Nearly Knocks Over Kayaker
Seal-watching tours let people interact with these naturally curious animals, but experts warn this could endanger both people and seals.
Demand For Seal Products Has Fallen—So Why Do Canadians Keep Hunting? loading...
Demand For Seal Products Has Fallen—So Why Do Canadians Keep Hunting?
The seal business isn’t booming any longer, but the Great White North is reluctant to give up the controversial pursuit.
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World loading...
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World
These 13 photos were among those recognized by the Underwater Photographer of the Year contest, which showcases the best in underwater photography.
Man Arrested for Punching a Seal loading...
Man Arrested for Punching a Seal
In this week’s crime blotter: a seal attack caught on video, a huge illegal logging bust, and an animal skull smuggling incident.
About Harp Seal

Harp seals spend relatively little time on land and prefer to swim in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. These sleek swimmers cruise the chilly waters and feed on fish and crustaceans. They can remain submerged for up to 15 minutes. Harp seals are sometimes called saddleback seals because of the dark, saddlelike marking on the back and sides of their light yellow or grey bodies.

Both sexes return each year to breeding grounds in Newfoundland, the Greenland Sea, and the White Sea. On this turf males fight for their mates, battling with sharp teeth and powerful flippers.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Harp Seal

Scientific Name: Pagophilus groenlandicus

Type: Mammals

Diet: Carnivores

Group Name: Colony, rookery

Average life span in the wild: 20 years

Size: 5.25 to 6.25 ft

Weight: 400 lbs

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