New Hunt For The Nazi Gold Train

Search for the train’s treasures and weapons is expected to start next week

The two men who claimed to have found a legendary Nazi gold train have been given the go-ahead to join a new search.

The pair will form one of two search teams who are expected to begin excavating next week. The searchers will be able to use radars, but not drills, to explore the site.

Back in September, Polish military inspected the location in south-west Poland for potential explosives and booby traps before eventually declaring the site safe.

The search area, a railway embankment in Walbrzych, includes Hitler’s command post at Ksiaz Castle and Project Riese. Some historians believe Project Riese was Hitler’s secret fortress while others contend it was dedicated to clandestine research.

Piotr Koper, one of the men claiming to have found the train, told The Guardian, “In the past 70 years, three cold war secret services – the United States, the Russian, then the Polish – carried out searches. We succeeded because we are local people.”

'Four years ago, we were given information by a witness who was in Walbrzych at the time the train disappeared in April 1945. Radar technology has become affordable, so we were able to check the information.”

“The Nazis dug out the embankment, created a junction and laid track to divert the train off to the side. Then they parked the train, which is 90 metres long, removed the rails and put back the soil.”

A local legend says that the train went missing in 1945 as the Red Army was closing in on Nazi forces at the end of World War II. It’s believed to contain masses of stolen valuables, missing artwork and dangerous weapons.

Many have dismissed the claims, but that hasn’t stopped prospectors from all over Europe making their way to Poland to seek their fortune.

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