Today 83 Years Ago: Archaeologists Enter King Tut’s Tomb

Video highlights from Ultimate Tutankhamun

Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon were the first people to step inside the tomb for more than 3,000 years

When British archaeologist Howard Carter arrived in Egypt, the tomb of the little-known King Tutankhamun remained elusive.

Carter’s five-year search led him into the Valley Of The Kings, and on 4 November 1922 he finally uncovered steps to the King Tut’s burial room hidden in debris.

On 26 November, Carter and archaeologist Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb’s interior chambers, finding them remarkably intact.

Over the next several years, Carter carefully explored the four-room tomb, discovering an amazing collection of several thousand objects, including the mummy of the boy-king Tutankhamun.

The mummy, preserved for more than 3,000 years, was found inside a stone sarcophagus that contained three coffins nested within each other.

This week, the Egyptian government announced they are conducting more tests in search of a hidden chamber in King Tut’s tomb.

It’s speculated the search will uncover the tomb of Nefertiti, the ancient Egyptian queen. Nefertiti was the wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten and widely famed for her beauty. 

British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves proposed earlier this year that Nefertiti’s tomb could be in a secret chamber adjoining Tutankhamun's.

Reeves argues that King Tutankhamun’s tomb was originally built for Nefertiti, a theory he backs up with evidence from Tutankhamun’s golden funerary mask and much of the burial equipment which he claims appear to have being designed for a woman.

Egypt is set to announce the findings on 28 November.

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