14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales loading...
14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales
From a killer whale on the hunt to narwhals touching tusks, we look at some of the most stunning photographs of marine giants.
Mysterious Whale Swarms Perplexing Scientists loading...
Mysterious Whale Swarms Perplexing Scientists
"Super-groups" of up to 200 humpback whales—a normally solitary species—are gathering off South Africa.
The Rare Beauty of Dozens of Migrating Humpback Whales loading...
The Rare Beauty of Dozens of Migrating Humpback Whales
See footage of a pod of humpback whales as they migrate past South Africa
Some Whales Like Global Warming Just Fine loading...
Some Whales Like Global Warming Just Fine
Humpbacks and bowheads are benefiting—for now, at least—from the retreat of polar sea ice: It's making it easier for them to find food.
Haunting Whale Sounds Emerge From Ocean's Deepest Point loading...
Haunting Whale Sounds Emerge From Ocean's Deepest Point
New experiment calls to mind classic recording made famous by National Geographic.
About Humpback Whale

Humpback whales are known for their magical songs, which travel for great distances through the world's oceans.

These whales are found near coastlines, feeding on tiny shrimp-like krill, plankton, and small fish. Humpbacks migrate annually from summer feeding grounds near the poles to warmer winter breeding waters closer to the Equator. Mothers and their young swim close together, often touching one another with their flippers with what appear to be gestures of affection. Females nurse their calves for almost a year, though it takes far longer than that for a humpback whale to reach full adulthood. Calves do not stop growing until they are ten years old.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Humpback Whale

Scientific Name: Megaptera novaeangliae

Type: Mammals

Diet:  Omnivores

Group Name: POd 

Size: 48 to 62.5 ft

Weight: 40 tons

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