How to Save the Jaguars? Turn the Locals From Foe to Friend loading...
How to Save the Jaguars? Turn the Locals From Foe to Friend
A National Geographic Explorer aims to help conserve the jaguar population in Panama by enlisting the help of local farmers.
Exclusive: Jungle Puppies Captured on Film for the First Time loading...
Exclusive: Jungle Puppies Captured on Film for the First Time
A new effort to catalogue animals in Peru's rain forests has captured some incredible footage of a rarely seen canine.
Jaguar Paraded at Olympic Torch Ceremony Shot Dead loading...
Jaguar Paraded at Olympic Torch Ceremony Shot Dead
The big cat was exhibited chained up in Manaus, Brazil, prompting outrage. Olympics officials say nothing of this sort will happen again.
How Jaguars Survived the Ice Age loading...
How Jaguars Survived the Ice Age
While others were driven into extinction this big cat managed to survive.
Jaguars loading...
Jaguars
The jaguar, scientific name Panthera onco, is the largest of the big cats of South America and the third largest in the world.
Jaguar Ambush: Facts loading...
Jaguar Ambush: Facts
Learn more about jaguars
About Jaguars

While best identified by their orange or tan fur with black spots, some jaguars are so dark in colour that it can be difficult to make out their spots. They can grow up to 1.8 metres long and weigh up to 113 kilograms.

Unlike other big cat, jaguars are excellent swimmers allowing them to access food from rivers including fish and turtles along with land-dwelling prey like deer and tapirs.

Jaguars are now only found in noteworthy numbers in remote areas of South and Central America. They tend to live alone and strongly defend their territory.

Females have between one and four cubs per litter, who they must protect from all dangers – even their father.

Jaguars are classified as near threatened, a result of still being widely hunted for their striking fur and sometimes killed by farmers for attacking livestock

Scroll through the videos, photos and articles below to find out more about jaguars.

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