Sorry, we couldn't find any results!
Please try a different filter above.

About Llama

The llama is a South American relative of the camel, though the llama does not have a hump.

These sturdy creatures are domestic animals used by the peoples of the Andes Mountains. (Their wild relatives are guanacos and vicuñas). Native peoples have used llamas as pack animals for centuries. Typically, they are saddled with loads of 50 to 75 pounds. Under such weight they can cover up to 20 miles in a single day. Pack trains of llamas, which can include several hundred animals, move large amounts of goods over even the very rough terrain of the Andes.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Llama

Scientific Name: Lama glama

Type: Mammals

Diet: Herbivores

Size: Height at the shoulder, 47 in

Weight: 250 lbs

 

Newsletter

Never miss a Nat Geo moment

Your email address
Submit