Australia And New Zealand Like Never Before

Stunning aerial shots make the world look like a work of art.

These pictures may look like the work of an abstract artist, but they’re actually real aerial photographs of planet Earth.

The captivating views of deserts, forests and glaciers are part of a series from the US Geological Survey called Earth As Art.

Using the satellite Landstat 8, the team collects more than 700 images across the world every day and turn the best of them into art.

Melted Colours
This enhanced image of Western Australia resembles a mixture of crayons that melted in the sun. The yellow sand dunes of the Great Sandy Desert cover the upper right portion of the image. Red splotches indicate burned areas from grass and forest fires, and the colours in the rest of the image depict different types of surface geology.

Nature’s Patterns
The biologically complex conditions of mangroves are shown in dark green along the fingers of the Ord River in Australia. Yellow, orange, and blue represent the impressive flow patterns of sediment and nutrients in this tropical estuary. The bright spot at the lower left is an area of mudflats, which is home to saltwater crocodiles.

Australian Iron Ore
Within the Hamersley Iron Province in Western Australia, Landsat's shortwave infrared and near-infrared detectors highlight different types of rock. The oval in the upper centre part of the image is a geological feature called Rocklea Dome. The dark meanders within the dome are channel iron deposits.

Mount Taranaki
A nearly perfect circle of forest delineates the boundary of Egmont National Park in New Zealand. Snow-capped Mount Taranaki marks the centre of the park, which is surrounded by green farmland.

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