Giant Crack Appears Near Yellowstone National Park

Video highlights from America's National Parks

The sudden fracture measures almost 700 metres long

An enormous crack has opened up in the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains near Yellowstone National Park.

The crack, measuring around 685 metres long and 45 metres wide, is believed to be a slow-moving landslide.

Hunting outfitter SNS was the first to post pictures of the site, saying “This giant crack in the earth appeared in the last two weeks on a ranch we hunt in the Bighorn Mountains.”

“Everyone here is calling it ‘the gash’. It’s a really incredible sight.”

While hunting this past weekend in the Bighorns, we came across an awesome example of how our earth is not as stable as you might think.  Awesome forces at work here to move this much dirt!!

Posted by Randy Becker on Monday, October 26, 2015

While tectonic movements in the Earth crust can easily cause sudden displacement of large amounts of material, there has been no seismic activity reported in the area.

One theory is that the crack was formed in a similar way to how sinkholes are created. Learn the science behind sinkholes below.

The crack’s proximity to Yellowstone has some concerned that the supervolcano under the national park is about to erupt, but scientists say the event is unrelated. 

Yellowstone’s supervolcano has had three major eruptions in history. The supervolcano last erupted back 174,000 years ago and last flowed with lava around 70,000 years ago.

The eruption back 640,000 years ago created the famous Yellowstone Caldera, a cauldron-like volcanic crater that measures 48 kilometers wide and 72 kilometres long. 

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