3.6 Million More Penguins Live in Antarctica Than Thought loading...
3.6 Million More Penguins Live in Antarctica Than Thought
New research estimates roughly six million Adélie penguins live in East Antarctica—cause for celebration and concern.
Why Adult Penguins Mooch Off Their Parents loading...
Why Adult Penguins Mooch Off Their Parents
Galápagos penguins are one of only two penguin species that hang out near their childhood home—for a reason, a new study says.
Five Big Environmental Wins in 2016 loading...
Five Big Environmental Wins in 2016
Sure, it's been a tumultuous year for the planet. But here are some environmental achievements to celebrate: renewable energy, protected oceans, and deconstructed dams.
Sydney Aquarium Welcomes New King loading...
Sydney Aquarium Welcomes New King
Sydney’s SEA LIFE Aquarium is getting excited about the royal arrival of their very first King penguin.
Antarctica Could Lose Most of Its Penguins to Climate Change loading...
Antarctica Could Lose Most of Its Penguins to Climate Change
A new study finds significant impact, and a possible silver lining, for the iconic birds over the next century.
About Penguins

Penguins predominately live in the Southern Hemisphere since they are well adapted for the cold. However, the Galapagos and fairy penguin along with other small penguins are more likely to be found in warmer climates closer to the equator.

The largest penguin is the emperor penguin, which grows to the size of a human child weighing in at 35 kilograms. The smallest penguin can be found here in Australia and is appropriately named the fairy penguin, weighing only 1 kilogram.

During the breeding season penguins usually stay with one mate and share the parenting duties. The female emperor penguin will lay a single egg, while all other penguins usually lay two or three. The male emperor penguin is then responsible for caring for the egg until and after it hatches.

It is believed that penguins could once fly but have evolved flippers instead of wings to be able to move rapidly through the water. Their streamlined bodies and waterproof coat make them extremely agile hunters underwater.

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