Why Morgan Freeman Went Looking For Spiritual Answers

Video highlights from The Story Of God With Morgan Freeman

How did we get here? What happens when we die?

Morgan Freeman is an actor and director who has famously voice the Almighty. Now he’s asking big cosmological questions – How did we get here? What happens when we die?

We spoke to Freeman about his quest for answers that took him to hallowed sites around the globe, from a Maya temple to the Vatican.

Did you come to this project with a curiosity about God and faith that you wanted to explore?

Well, I think I’m like most people who grew up with God. My grandmother was not religious but she was a studious believer.

Some people picture you as God, after you played God in the movie Bruce Almighty. Who do you see?

Well, I don’t think there is an image of God. I like the rays coming down from the clouds. I like seeing the Milky Way on a clear night. I like seeing 1,000 feet forward on the night of a full moon. That’s God. That is the essence of existence. You’re there with the great unknown.

How was it to visit these holy, heavily guarded places?

It wasn’t bad, except maybe on one occasion at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. We got kicked out because I’ve got a big mouth – because I used an unallowable word, which we didn’t realise was unallowable.

We were in one of the toms below where the Crucifixion of Jesus took place. I used the term “myth” in regards to what happened there, and we were asked to leave post-haste. Out. But we were allowed back in the next day.

What do you hope people get from the Story of God?

We live in a time where people see differences. We’re trying to show them the commonalities. There are serious commonalities between the world’s religions. I love that.

We hear about God on TV, the Mideast crisis, during presidential debates, the name of God is evoked. I think there’s no more important time to look at our own relationship and other people’s relationship with God and try to understand it. It’s a really important time in our history.

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