Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica loading...
Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica
Cameras attached to humpback whales are giving researchers fresh insight into a rapidly changing Southern Ocean.
14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales loading...
14 Jaw-Dropping Pictures of Whales
From a killer whale on the hunt to narwhals touching tusks, we look at some of the most stunning photographs of marine giants.
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World loading...
See Award-Winning Underwater Photos From Around the World
These 13 photos were among those recognized by the Underwater Photographer of the Year contest, which showcases the best in underwater photography.
Japanese Ship Has Killed A Whale In Australian Waters loading...
Japanese Ship Has Killed A Whale In Australian Waters
Photos released by Sea Shepherd show a dead minke whale on the deck of a ship allegedly in Australian waters.
Mysterious New Whale Species Discovered in Alaska loading...
Mysterious New Whale Species Discovered in Alaska
Scientists say a dead whale on a desolate beach and a skeleton hanging in a high school gym are a new species. Yet experts have never seen one alive.
Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us loading...
Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us
Seven species of the marine mammals have been seen clinging to the dead body of a likely friend or relative, a new study says.
About Right Whale

Right whales are the rarest of all large whales. There are several species, but all are identified by enormous heads, which can measure up to one-third of their total body length.

These whales' massive heads and jaws accommodate hundreds of baleen “teeth.” Rights and other baleen-feeding whales use a comblike strainer of baleen plates and bristles to ensnare tiny morsels of food as they swim. Right whales feed on zooplankton and other tiny organisms using baleens up to 8 feet long.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Right Whales

Scientific Name: Eubalaena

Type: Mammals

Diet: Carnivores

Group Name: Pod

Size: 50 ft

Weight: 70 tons

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