Ancient Giant Sloth Fossil Found in Underwater Cave loading...
Ancient Giant Sloth Fossil Found in Underwater Cave
While cave diving in Mexico, explorers uncovered 10,000-year-old remains of a new sloth species.
World's Oldest Known Sloth Dies of Old Age loading...
World's Oldest Known Sloth Dies of Old Age
At 43 years old, the sloth, affectionately named Miss C, lived for twice as long as other sloths of the same species.
Unbelievably Cute Pictures of Rescued Baby Sloths loading...
Unbelievably Cute Pictures of Rescued Baby Sloths
In her new book, Slothlove, photographer Sam Trull brings us inside a sloth rehab center in Costa Rica.
Watch Divers Find Sloth Fossils in Underwater Cave loading...
Watch Divers Find Sloth Fossils in Underwater Cave
The impeccably preserved skeletons could shed further light on the extinction that killed off woolly mammoths.
Sloths Don't Get Dizzy Hanging Upside Down—Here's Why loading...
Sloths Don't Get Dizzy Hanging Upside Down—Here's Why
Being tiny and moving slowly are key for animals who live on the flip side.
Sloth Facts That Will Make You Smile loading...
Sloth Facts That Will Make You Smile
Sloths only go to the bathroom once a week!
About Sloth

The sloth is the world's slowest mammal, so sedentary that algae grows on its furry coat. The plant gives it a greenish tint that is useful camouflage in the trees of its Central and South American rain forest home.

All sloths are built for life in the treetops. They spend nearly all of their time aloft, hanging from branches with a powerful grip aided by their long claws. (Dead sloths have been known to retain their grip and remain suspended from a branch.) Sloths even sleep in trees, and they sleep a lot—some 15 to 20 hours every day. Even when awake they often remain motionless. At night they eat leaves, shoots, and fruit from the trees and get almost all of their water from juicy plants.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Three-Toed Sloths

Scientific Name: Bradypus

Type: Mammals

Diet: Herbivores

Size: 23 in

Weight: 8.75 lbs

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