About The Show
Of the five years he spends circling the world on the H.M.S. Beagle, Darwin spends a mere five weeks in the Galapagos islands and, contrary to conventional belief, his greatest epiphanies do not occur on the famed islands. Instead, they are a cultivation of years exploring the wilds of South America where forests become the cathedral of Darwin's religion. Darwin's senses are overwhelmed by a world teeming with life, but what he finds along the way is perplexing to a 19th century naturalist. He questions why the fossils he discovers look like giant versions of the sloths and armadillos still living nearby; why do the penguins and other birds he sees use their wings as flippers, fins, or sails - but not for flying; how could sea shells be found embedded in rock layers more than 100 miles from the sea? It is not until after he leaves the Galapagos - where mockingbirds, not finches capture his attention - that he is able to fully appreciate everything he has encountered and pull together his masterwork: On The Origin of Species.
Darwin's Dilemma loading...
Darwin's Dilemma
Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection was a big idea that transformed how we view the world and our place in it.
Darwin's Voyages loading...
Darwin's Voyages
In 1831 at the age of 22, Charles Darwin was given the opportunity of travelling aboard a survey ship, HMS Beagle, as a naturalist. It would prove to be a life-changing experience for him.

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