Extremely Rare Albino Orangutan Found in Indonesia loading...
Extremely Rare Albino Orangutan Found in Indonesia
The foundation nursing the primate back to health says they have never taken care of an albino orangutan and cannot find others like it in the wild.
Orangutans Nurse For a Record-Breaking Amount of Time loading...
Orangutans Nurse For a Record-Breaking Amount of Time
The Southeast Asian apes suckle for longer than any other primate on Earth, a new study says.
A Baby Gorilla's Mom Was Killed, So This Woman Raised Him loading...
A Baby Gorilla's Mom Was Killed, So This Woman Raised Him
A surging trade in bush meat puts baby primates in peril when adults are killed by poachers.
This Nature Reserve Boasts Natural Beauty—and a Monkey Circus? loading...
This Nature Reserve Boasts Natural Beauty—and a Monkey Circus?
At Vietnam’s Can Gio reserve, a place where wildlife is supposed to be protected, monkeys are forced to jump over flames, walk tightropes, and ride bicycles.
How Sniffing Poop Helps Monkeys Stay Healthy loading...
How Sniffing Poop Helps Monkeys Stay Healthy
Like humans, mandrills of central Africa have strategies to avoid getting sick.
The World’s Snowiest Place Is Starting to Melt loading...
The World’s Snowiest Place Is Starting to Melt
The mountains of northwestern Japan have long received up to 125 feet of snow a year—but that's starting to change, prompting locals to ask how long it will last.
Lost Tourist Says Monkeys Saved Him in the Amazon loading...
Lost Tourist Says Monkeys Saved Him in the Amazon
Locals believe the young man angered forest spirits—before he disappeared mysteriously for nine days—but he is just glad to be alive.
A Mob Of Cute Baby Squirrel Monkeys Born At Taronga loading...
A Mob Of Cute Baby Squirrel Monkeys Born At Taronga
See adorable photos of a troop of squirrel monkeys born at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo.
Rare Tamarin Baby At Taronga Looks Like A Tiny Punk loading...
Rare Tamarin Baby At Taronga Looks Like A Tiny Punk
It’s the first cotton-top tamarin born in Taronga Zoo in 10 years.
Why Did the Monkey Try to Mate With Deer? loading...
Why Did the Monkey Try to Mate With Deer?
Why did a male macaque mount a sika deer in Japan? Scientists have some theories.
Bet You’ve Never Heard of This Shy, Colourful Monkey loading...
Bet You’ve Never Heard of This Shy, Colourful Monkey
Drill monkeys share a colourful feature with their cousin the mandrill.
About the Show
Among the leafy avenues of an exclusive residential estate in South Africa, a turf war between rival gangs is breaking out. Battle lines have been drawn and teeth are bared. But, it is not humans leading the charge on this offensive attack; it is their primate cousins – the wily Vervet monkeys. This 5-part series follows the Pani troop of Vervet monkeys as they screech, bite and broadside their way to the top of the monkey pyramid in this real life monkey soap opera. What these Vervets lack in size, they make up for in resourcefulness and insatiable curiosity. Scaling rooftops and sneaking through windows, the Vervets have made Mt. Edgecombe – an exclusive residential club estate in Durban, South Africa – their personal playground. Like kids in a candy store, the Vervet monkeys of the Pani troop steal almost any food they can get their hands on, and a sugar rush has much the same effect on these little monkeys as on little humans. But life is about to get much more difficult for the Pani troop, as invading Vervets from the outside threaten to overtake the Pani territory. The troop must band together or risk losing everything. The Pani males are more interested in showing off their assets and securing their position in the male hierarchy than in guarding the troop. Will alpha female Bess and her Pani sisterhood be able to protect the Pani stake in Mt. Edgecombe from the streetwise Sugar Cane Gang? And when a monkey in their midst starts attacking the juveniles, will the Pani females be able to fend off the attacker before it is too late? With key insight into Vervet behaviour and a play-by-play analysis of complex Vervet gestures and movements, Street Monkeys opens a unique window into these adorable primates’ everyday interactions, which can be surprisingly similar to their more advanced human counterparts.

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