Only One-Eighth of the Ocean is Free of Human Impact loading...
Only One-Eighth of the Ocean is Free of Human Impact
Thirteen percent of the world’s oceans is considered marine wilderness—crucial areas of water mostly undisturbed by humans where biodiversity is able to flourish.
A Running List of Action on Plastic Pollution loading...
A Running List of Action on Plastic Pollution
The world is waking up to a crisis of ocean plastic—and we're tracking the developments and solutions as they happen.
Why Jack Johnson Sailed The Sargasso Sea Searching For Plastic loading...
Why Jack Johnson Sailed The Sargasso Sea Searching For Plastic
The artist and surfer, who grew up in Hawaii, is driving awareness of ocean pollution.
We Made Plastic. We Depend on It. Now We’re Drowning in It. loading...
We Made Plastic. We Depend on It. Now We’re Drowning in It.
The miracle material has made modern life possible. But more than 40 percent of it is used just once, and it’s choking our waterways.
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Isn’t What You Think It Is loading...
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Isn’t What You Think It Is
It’s not all bottles and straws—the patch is mostly abandoned fishing gear.
Straw Wars: The Fight To Rid the Oceans Of Discarded Plastic loading...
Straw Wars: The Fight To Rid the Oceans Of Discarded Plastic
Americans use 500 million straws daily. Citizen activists want to shrink that number.
About Air Pollution

Smog hanging over cities is the most familiar and obvious form of air pollution. But there are different kinds of pollution—some visible, some invisible—that contribute to global warming. Generally any substance that people introduce into the atmosphere that has damaging effects on living things and the environment is considered air pollution.

Carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, is the main pollutant that is warming Earth. Though living things emit carbon dioxide when they breathe, carbon dioxide is widely considered to be a pollutant when associated with cars, planes, power plants, and other human activities that involve the burning of fossil fuels such as gasoline and natural gas. In the past 150 years, such activities have pumped enough carbon dioxide into the atmosphere to raise its levels higher than they have been for hundreds of thousands of years.

 

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