How Do You Study Endangered Whales? Collect Their Snot loading...
How Do You Study Endangered Whales? Collect Their Snot
A new technique allows scientists to accurately measure hormone levels in whales using only their breath.
Orcas Slap, Kill, But Don't Eat Their Prey loading...
Orcas Slap, Kill, But Don't Eat Their Prey
It’s impossible to tell why the whales didn’t eat their prey, one expert says, but here are a few suggestions.
How This Whale Got Nearly 20 Pounds of Plastic in Its Stomach loading...
How This Whale Got Nearly 20 Pounds of Plastic in Its Stomach
Eighty shopping bags and other plastic debris clogged the animal’s stomach, making it unable to eat.
Prehistoric Toothless Whale Among Oldest of Its Kind loading...
Prehistoric Toothless Whale Among Oldest of Its Kind
Fossils unearthed in New Zealand belonged to an ancestor of minkes and humpbacks that lived about 27.5 million years ago.
Why Do Whales Get So Big? Science May Have An Answer. loading...
Why Do Whales Get So Big? Science May Have An Answer.
Marine mammals have evolved their whopping size for a reason—and it's not what we expected.
Bad Breeding Season Spells Trouble For Endangered Whale loading...
Bad Breeding Season Spells Trouble For Endangered Whale
Left unchecked, human activity killing the North Atlantic right whales could make them go extinct in 20 years, experts say.
About Beluga Whale

Belugas are also called white whales, and their unusual colour makes them one of the most familiar and easily distinguishable of all the whales. Calves are born grey or even brown and only fade to white as they become sexually mature around five years of age.

White whales are smallish, ranging from 13 to 20 feet in length. They have rounded foreheads and no dorsal fin.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Beluga Whale

Scientific Name: Delphinapterus leucas

Type: Mammals

Diet: Carnivores

Group Name: Pod

Average life span in the wild: 35 to 50 years

Size: 13 to 20 ft

Weight: 1 to 1.5 tons

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