Blue-Footed Booby

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About Blue-Footed Booby

Blue-footed boobies are aptly named, and males take great pride in their fabulous feet. During mating rituals, male birds show off their feet to prospective mates with a high-stepping strut. The bluer the feet, the more attractive the mate.

These boobies live off the western coasts of Central and South America. The Galápagos Islands population includes about half of all breeding pairs of blue-footed boobies.

All half-dozen or so booby species are thought to take their name from the Spanish word "bobo." The term means "stupid," which is how early European colonists may have characterised these clumsy and unwary birds when they saw them on land—their least graceful environment.

Fast Facts 

Type: Bird

Diet: Carnivore

Average life span in the wild: 17 years

Size: 32 to 34 in (80 to 85 cm); Wingspan, nearly 5 ft (1.5 m)

Weight: 3.25 lbs (1.5 kg)

Group name: Flock

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