Freshwater Pollution

Cigarette Butts Are Toxic Plastic Pollution. Should They Be Banned? loading...
Cigarette Butts Are Toxic Plastic Pollution. Should They Be Banned?
Trillions of cigarette butts are thrown into the environment every year, where they leach nicotine and heavy metals before turning into microplastic pollution.
Sperm whale found dead with 13 pounds of plastic in its stomach loading...
Sperm whale found dead with 13 pounds of plastic in its stomach
The animal had swallowed plastic bags, bottles, flip-flops, and 115 drinking cups.
25 places that have committed to going zero-waste loading...
25 places that have committed to going zero-waste
These places are going waste-free, and have already taken important steps in the process.
Beach clean-up study shows global scope of plastic pollution loading...
Beach clean-up study shows global scope of plastic pollution
What items retrieved from beaches tell us about trash.
'Alarming' level of microplastics found in a major U.S. river loading...
'Alarming' level of microplastics found in a major U.S. river
Scientists describe the biodiverse Tennessee River as an underwater rain forest, but plastic may put the ecosystem in jeopardy.
To honour an elephant, Indian temples are going plastic-free loading...
To honour an elephant, Indian temples are going plastic-free
Hindu temples in southern India are taking a stand against single-use plastic. Other faiths are taking notice.
About Freshwater Pollution

As technology improves, scientists are able to detect more pollutants, and at smaller concentrations, in Earth’s freshwater bodies. Containing traces of contaminants ranging from birth control pills and sunscreen to pesticides and petroleum, our planet's lakes, rivers, streams, and groundwater are often a chemical cocktail.

Beyond synthetic pollution, freshwater is also the end point for biological waste, in the form of human sewage, animal excrement, and rainwater runoff flavoured by nutrient-rich fertilisers from yards and farms. These nutrients find their way through river systems into seas, sometimes creating coastal ocean zones void of oxygen—and therefore aquatic life—and making the connection between land and sea painfully obvious. When you dump paint down the drain, it often ends up in the ocean, via freshwater systems.

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