How Do You Study Endangered Whales? Collect Their Snot loading...
How Do You Study Endangered Whales? Collect Their Snot
A new technique allows scientists to accurately measure hormone levels in whales using only their breath.
Orcas Slap, Kill, But Don't Eat Their Prey loading...
Orcas Slap, Kill, But Don't Eat Their Prey
It’s impossible to tell why the whales didn’t eat their prey, one expert says, but here are a few suggestions.
How This Whale Got Nearly 20 Pounds of Plastic in Its Stomach loading...
How This Whale Got Nearly 20 Pounds of Plastic in Its Stomach
Eighty shopping bags and other plastic debris clogged the animal’s stomach, making it unable to eat.
Prehistoric Toothless Whale Among Oldest of Its Kind loading...
Prehistoric Toothless Whale Among Oldest of Its Kind
Fossils unearthed in New Zealand belonged to an ancestor of minkes and humpbacks that lived about 27.5 million years ago.
Why Do Whales Get So Big? Science May Have An Answer. loading...
Why Do Whales Get So Big? Science May Have An Answer.
Marine mammals have evolved their whopping size for a reason—and it's not what we expected.
Bad Breeding Season Spells Trouble For Endangered Whale loading...
Bad Breeding Season Spells Trouble For Endangered Whale
Left unchecked, human activity killing the North Atlantic right whales could make them go extinct in 20 years, experts say.
About Gray Whale

Gray whales are often covered with parasites and other organisms that make their snouts and backs look like a crusty ocean rock.

The gray whale is one of the animal kingdom's great migrators. Traveling in groups called pods, some of these giants swim 12,430 miles round-trip from their summer home in Alaskan waters to the warmer waters off the Mexican coast. The whales winter and breed in the shallow southern waters and balmier climate. Other gray whales live in the seas near Korea.

Fast Facts 

Common Name: Gray Whale

Scientific Name: Eschrichtius robustus

Type: Mammals

Diet: Omnivores

Group Name: Pod

Size: 40 to 50 ft

Weight: 30 to 40 tons

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