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Facts about gold!

Video highlights from Yukon Gold

We bet you didn't know these..

  • The average cell phone contains $1.29 worth of gold.
  • Injectible gold solutions can be used to treat rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Radioactive gold particles can be used to treat certain cancers.
  • Gold film is used to coat spacecrafts to protect them from radiation.
  • Gold is commonly used in dentistry because it is malleable, non-allergenic, and does not rust.
  • Gold is sometimes found in skin care products - intended (though not proven) to brighten skin and reduce wrinkles.
  • Gold is used to make pacemakers and stents.
  • Thin gold strips have been added to certain foods.
  • Gold appears in certain creams and facial beauty products.
  • Gold is common in electrical circuits.
  • Gold is used to coat some compact discs.
  • Gold is used to coat astronaut visors to protect them from radiation.
  • Gold can be found in window glass, including the entire Royal Bank Plaza skyscraper in Toronto.
  • Gold has many uses in manufacturing including lubrication, coatings, and moldings.
  • Gold's chemical symbol "AU" comes from the Latin word "aurum" which means "shining dawn."
  • Gold cannot rust. It is unable to fuse with oxygen.
  • Gold's purity is measured on the carat scale. 24 is 100% pure.
  • Because gold is naturally soft, it is often mixed with other metals in jewelry.
  • Cell phones, computers, televisions, locator chips, audio/visual cables all often contain gold.
  • Gold melts at 1064 degrees C. Hot!
  • If you melted down all the gold mined in human history, it would only fill a 20 meter cube. That's it!
  • Roughly 100000 prospectors rushed to the Yukon to look for gold in the 1890s.
  • Of the thousands of men who participated in the Klondike Gold Rush, very few made it rich.
  • Staking a gold mining claim is not much different than it was in the 1890s, as are the odds.
  • Gold was worth about $20 per ounce in 1900. In 2011, it was nearly $1900 per ounce!
     

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