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Planet or Plastic?

The world agrees there's a plastic waste crisis—can it agree on a solution? loading...
The world agrees there's a plastic waste crisis—can it agree on a solution?
Many countries are disappointed the UN didn’t reach a more definitive agreement on plastic pollution in Kenya, yet efforts continue at national and international levels.
Is burning plastic waste a good idea? loading...
Is burning plastic waste a good idea?
Many within the trash industry think so. But incineration and other “waste-to-energy” projects may pose dangers to the environment.
Sperm whale found dead with 13 pounds of plastic in its stomach loading...
Sperm whale found dead with 13 pounds of plastic in its stomach
The animal had swallowed plastic bags, bottles, flip-flops, and 115 drinking cups.
In a first, microplastics found in human poop loading...
In a first, microplastics found in human poop
As microplastics permeate remote places and species around the globe, people are no exception.
To honour an elephant, Indian temples are going plastic-free loading...
To honour an elephant, Indian temples are going plastic-free
Hindu temples in southern India are taking a stand against single-use plastic. Other faiths are taking notice.
The 16-Year-Old Changing the World loading...
The 16-Year-Old Changing the World
Angelina Arora is not a typical teenager.
About Planet or Plastic?

National Geographic launches Planet or Plastic? 

A multi-year initiative aimed at raising awareness of this challenge and reducing the amount of single-use plastic that enters in the world’s oceans. Doing so will not only benefit the thousands to potentially millions of marine animals that become entangled in, suffocated by, or ingest plastic each year, but will also contribute to the overall health of the planet’s marine ecosystems and all who rely upon them.

Each year, 9 million tons of plastic waste ends up in the ocean. Some estimates suggest this plastic could remain in marine environments for 450 years or longer, and the problem is only getting worse. Addressing a challenge of this magnitude requires an unprecedented approach.

Through the Planet or Plastic? initiative, we will share the stories of this growing crisis, work to address it through the latest science and research, and educate audiences around the world about how to eliminate single-use plastics and prevent them from making their way into our oceans." says said Gary E. Knell, CEO of National Geographic Partners. 

Will you take the Pledge? Starting today, National Geographic will ask audiences around the world to take the Planet or Plastic? pledge, a commitment to reduce their use of single-use plastic. By taking the pledge, individuals will become part of a global community working together to stem the tide of single-use plastic polluting the ocean and will continue to receive information and tips to help them in their efforts. The pledge marks the beginning of a comprehensive consumer awareness and engagement campaign that National Geographic will execute across its multiple platforms in the months and years to come. Elements of this campaign will range from inspiring and informative content, ongoing consumer engagement activities, events and more.

Get the latest updates on Planet or Plastic? here and join the conversation on social via #planetorplastic.

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