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Discovering how things in the universe work.

Science

The Milky Way Is Warped Around The Edges, New Star Map Confirms loading...
The Milky Way Is Warped Around The Edges, New Star Map Confirms
If we could see it from outside, our home galaxy would not be a flat disk, but would look more like a poached egg sliding off a slotted spoon.
One of biggest great white sharks seen feasting on sperm whale in rare video loading...
One of biggest great white sharks seen feasting on sperm whale in rare video
The famous Deep Blue and two other large females were spotted off Hawaii, an unusual gathering and location for the elusive predators.
Dear Columbia: Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins says thanks loading...
Dear Columbia: Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins says thanks
The mission's command module pilot pays tribute to the spacecraft that kept him company on the moon's far side.
About Science

Science is the study of the organisation and behaviour of the physical world through observation and experimentation. Or in more simple terms, discovering how things in the universe work.

While there are many ways to group the fields of science, they are commonly divided into three groups – formal sciences (such as mathematics), natural sciences (such as biology) and social sciences (such as anthropology).

Science existed in a general sense in historical civilisations, but it wasn’t until the 19th century that modern science began to transform our view of the universe.

One of the great early scientists was Galileo Galilei, an Italian thinker whose pioneering observations laid the foundation for modern physics and astronomy, who was referred to as the father of modern science by no less than Albert Einstein.

The leading scientific figure of the 17th century was Sir Isaac Newton, who determined the theory of gravity and the three fundamental laws of motion.

The scientific revolution established science as the foundation for the growth of knowledge. Key achievements of this revolution included Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, Georges Lemaitre’s Big Bang theory, Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin and Albert Einstein’s introduction of E = mc².

Scroll through the videos, photos and articles below to find out more about science.

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