Troodon Formosus

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About Troodon Formosus

Troodon formosus was a small coelurosaurian dinosaur—a member of the same clade (evolutionary group) to which modern birds belong. Fossilised remains have been discovered of nesting parents and egg clutches. These finds shed some light on reproductive strategies that resemble those of both crocodilians and birds.

Scientists believe that Troodon produced a pair of eggs at periodic intervals and then incubated them in earth nests, sometimes sitting on them and warming them with body heat. Such behaviour suggests that these dinosaurs could be an important link on the evolutionary chain, bridging the gap between their earlier relatives (crocodilians) and their later relatives (birds).

Fast Facts 

Type: Prehistoric

Diet: Carnivore

Size: 6.5 ft (2 m) long; 110 lbs (50 kg)

Did you know? Troodon had sharp, curved, serrated teeth that lent it its name, which means "wounding tooth."

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