Amazing Fossil Shark Skeleton Is The First Of Its Kind loading...
Amazing Fossil Shark Skeleton Is The First Of Its Kind
Skulls and a nearly complete skeleton offer our best look yet at a shark that lived about 360 million years ago.
Mako Sharks Get New Protections From Trade loading...
Mako Sharks Get New Protections From Trade
At the global wildlife trade meeting in Geneva, countries have decided to protect the endangered mako shark from trade.
These Sharks Glow Underwater—Thanks To Tiny Lightsabers loading...
These Sharks Glow Underwater—Thanks To Tiny Lightsabers
A new study finds a brand-new chemical pathway for biofluorescence in sharks—and the molecules are also antibacterial.
Veggie-eating shark surprises scientists loading...
Veggie-eating shark surprises scientists
It turns out they can also fast for months on end. But why?
New find could help save Galapagos hammerhead sharks loading...
New find could help save Galapagos hammerhead sharks
The sharks give birth in secluded bays that scientists worry may be exposed to fishing.
What it Takes to Guard a Giant Shark Sanctuary loading...
What it Takes to Guard a Giant Shark Sanctuary
An unlikely group—including a National Geographic explorer and a former shark smuggler—team up to protect the Cook Islands' sharks.
About the Show
Hollywood has typecast the great white shark as a ferocious predator intent on finding yet another swimmer to feast on, yet this apex predator has no taste for human flesh. The stereotype inflates the bounty for their teeth, jaws and fins, yet despite years of research, the great white remains one of the most vulnerable and elusive creatures of the deep. Shark Men boldly unmasks the mysteries of the world’s largest predatory fish as it chronicles a team of expert anglers led by Chris Fischer and Dr. Michael Domeier. They have joined forces on a ground-breaking expedition in search of great whites. Their goal is to unlock the secrets of the shark’s migratory patterns, breeding and birthing sites. Racing through the ocean at over 40 kilometres an hour, with 300 razor-sharp teeth and 2,200 kilograms of bulk, just how do you capture a great white shark? Only the right combination of brains, brawn and audacity could safely lift them out of the water, attach special tracking devices, and return them to the ocean - unharmed.

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